• Type:
  • Genre:
  • Duration:
  • Average Rating:

Personalities

Understanding ERDOĞAN’S POLITICS | KJ Vids

In June 2018, Turkey’s President Erdogan claimed victory in presidential and parliamentary elections, securing five more years in office. Despite concerns about the economy and a plunging Lira, Erdogan won 53% of the vote with over 90% of ballot boxes opened.

His victory triggered a change to a powerful presidential system that places unprecedented powers in his hands. These powers include complete control of the cabinet and the power to appoint senior judges and officials, including unelected vice-presidents.

To the outside world, the election was the latest step in Erdogan’s systematic consolidation of power and his bid to transform the once-staunchly secular republic in his more religiously minded image.

But while many commentators in the West resent Erdogan for his Islamist leanings, the real ideology that underpins his rule is not religion, but secular nationalism.

In this video we will look into the politics of Erdogan.

We hope you enjoyed and learn’t something new from our video. You can help us make more videos by supporting our crowdfunding campaign;

Mesut Ozil Quits International Football

▶ Check out my gear on Kit: https://kit.com/kjvids

MESUT ÖZIL – RACISM IN FOOTBALL

Mesut Özil is considered one of the greatest midfielders of his
generation.

The Arsenal midfielder quit international football, citing “racism and disrespect” he has faced in Germany.

In a lengthy statement posted on social media, he said he did not feel accepted in German society.

“Is it because it is Turkey? Is it because I’m a Muslim? I think here lays an important issue.”

He says he received hate mail and threats and was being blamed for Germany’s disappointing World Cup.

He felt singled out because of his Turkish heritage and his meeting with the Turkish President in May.

Ozil also cited statements from Germanpoliticians, racist taunts from fans and hate mail leading up to his decision.

Several other prominent European players of foreign descent also cited the same grievance.

“I am German when we win, but I am an immigrant when we lose,”

Thousands took to Twitter to support Ozil and lay scorn at the abuse Muslim and African players are subjected to in Europe.

Mesut Ozil’s story shows that despite the slogans, racism has not been kicked out of football.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Support our content by donating to fundmypage.com/kjvids

Website – www.kjvids.co.uk
Facebook – www.facebook.com/KJVids
Twitter – www.twitter.com/kjvids2016
Instagram – www.instagram.com/kjvidsofficial

All Rights Reserved. Contact info@kjvids.co.uk if you are interested in licensing our content, advertising or working with us in other ways.

Top 5 Facts About Mesut Özil

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]On Sunday 22nd July 2018, Mesut Özil, the professional German football player, announced that he was quitting the German national team in three lengthy and explosive social media posts that cited “racism and disrespect” he has faced in Germany over his Turkish roots. Here are five top facts about Mesut Özil.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_toggle title=”Fact 1: Mesut Özil received a prestigious German award as an example of “integration“ in German Society.”]In November 2010, Mesut Özil received the ‘Bambi Award’ in the ‘Integration’ category. He stole the show and was hailed as prime example of successful integration into German society. Upon his reward he said “This is a great honor for me and I’m very happy… Integration creates something new and makes for a more colorful Germany.”

[/vc_toggle][vc_toggle title=”Fact 2: Mesut Ozil recited the Holy Quran before World Cup matches”]

[/vc_toggle][vc_toggle title=”Fact 3: Mesut Özil is the most expensive German player of all time”]The star attacking midfielder became the most expensive German player of all time when he was acquired by Arsenal in 2013 for £42.5 million.[/vc_toggle][vc_toggle title=”Fact 4: Mesut Özil donated his 2014 World Cup winnings (est £240,000) to help sick Brazilian children for surgery”]Mesut Ozil was unveiled as an ambassador for the Big Shoe initiative, which uses the FIFA World Cup as inspiration to fund operations for young people around the world. The Big Shoe initiative was launched in 2006, ahead of the World Cup in Germany. [/vc_toggle][vc_toggle title=”Fact 5: Mesut Özil visited the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, home to 80,000 people displaced due to the Syrian civil war. “]

The German playmaker visited Zaatari Refugee Camp in the northeast of Jordan and joined Syrian boys and girls under the age of 13 in two short football matches.

[/vc_toggle][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_facebook][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”4988″ img_size=”full” onclick=”custom_link” css_animation=”bounceInUp” link=”https://www.fundmypage.com/postbanner”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Meet ZHENG HE – The Greatest CHINESE MUSLIM Explorer

When people think of great explorers, they think of the usual names: Marco Polo, Ibn Battuta, Evliya Çelebi, Christopher Columbus, etc.

But not many know of Zheng He. The Muslim who became China’s greatest admiral, explorer, and diplomat. In China, he is well known, although not always recognized or glorified.

Zheng was born in 1371 in the southern China region of Yunnan to a Muslim Chinese ethnic family and named Ma He.

In China, the family name is said first, followed by the given name. “Ma” is known in China as short for “Muhammad”, indicating Zheng Muslim heritage.

At a young age, his town was raided by the Ming Dynasty’s army. He was captured and transported to the capital, Nanjing, where he served in the imperial household.

Despite the oppressive and difficult circumstances he was in, Zheng actually befriended one of the princes, Zhu Di, and rose to the highest positions in government. He was given the honorific title “Zheng” and was known as Zheng He.

In 1405, when emperor Zhu Di decided to send out a giant fleet of ships to explore and trade with the rest of the world, he chose Zheng to lead the expedition.

This expedition was massive. In all, almost 30,000 sailors were in each voyage, with Zheng He commanding all of them.

Between 1405 and 1433, Zheng He led 7 expeditions that sailed to present day Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, India, Sri Lanka, Iran, Oman, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Kenya, and many other countries.

It is probable that during one of his journeys, Zheng He was even able to go to Makkah to complete the Hajj.

Zheng was not the only Muslim on these expeditions. Many of his advisors and were also Chinese Muslims, such as Ma Huan, a translator who spoke Arabic and was able to converse with the Muslim peoples they encountered on their journeys.

He wrote an account of his journeys, titled the , which is an important source today for understanding 15th century societies around the Indian Ocean.

The ships Zheng commanded were up to 400 feet long, many times the size of Columbus’s ships that sailed across the Atlantic.

Zheng would sail back to China with exotic goods such as ivory, camels, gold, and even a giraffe from Africa. The expeditions sent one message to the world: China is an economic and political superpower.

Economics and politics were not the only effects of this great fleet that was commanded by Zheng. He and his Muslim advisors regularly promoted Islam wherever they travelled.

In the Indonesian islands of Java, Sumatra, Borneo and others, Zheng found small communities of Muslims already there.

Islam had started to spread in Southeast Asia a few hundred years before through trade from Arabia and India. Zheng actively supported the continued growth of Islam in these areas.

Zheng established Chinese Muslim communities in Palembang, and along Java, the Malay Peninsula, and the Philippines.

These communities preached Islam to the local people and were very important to the spread of Islam in the area.

The fleet built masjids and provided other social services the local Muslim community would need.

Even after the death of Zheng in 1433, other Chinese Muslims continued his work in Southeast Asia, spreading Islam.

Chinese Muslim traders in Southeast Asia were encouraged to intermarry and assimilate with the local people on the islands and Malay Peninsula.

This brought more people to Islam in Southeast Asia, as well as strengthened and diversified the growing Muslim community.

As an admiral, diplomat, soldier, and trader, Zheng He is a giant of Chinese and Muslim history. He is seen as one of the greatest figured in the spread of Islam in Southeast Asia.

Unfortunately, after his death, the Chinese government changed its philosophy to a more Confucian one which did not support such expeditions like Zheng He’s.

As a result, his accomplishments and contributions were mostly forgotten or overlooked for hundreds of years in China.

His legacy in Southeast Asia, however is quite different. Numerous Mosques in the region are named after him to commemorate his contributions.

Islam spread in Southeast Asia through many forms, including trade, travelling preachers, and immigration.

Admiral Zheng He was also a major part of its spread in that region.

Today, Indonesia has the largest Muslim population of any nation in the world, and much of that could be attributed to the activities of Zheng He in the region.

▶ Check out my gear on Kit: https://kit.com/kjvids

Meet Zheng He – The Greatest Chinese Muslim Explorer

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Support our content by donating to fundmypage.com/kjvids

Website – www.kjvids.co.uk
Facebook – www.facebook.com/KJVids
Twitter – www.twitter.com/kjvids2016
Instagram – www.instagram.com/kjvidsofficial

All Rights Reserved. Contact info@kjvids.co.uk if you are interested in licensing our content, advertising or working with us in other ways.

Mohamad Salah – Liverpool’s Egyptian King

Mohamed Salah is an Egyptian Football sensation taking the world by Storm. He is dubbed ‘The Egyptian King’ by fans.
Salah comes from humble beginnings, growing up in a small village called Nagrig in Egypt.

He would travel up to 6 hours per day to attend El Mokawloon youth club from the age of 14.

El Mokawloon nurtured Salah’s talent for 6 years and watched him grow into a professional footballer in 2010.

The Port Said Stadium tragedy in 2012, saw thugs attack the opposing supporters, resulting in the death of 74 people.
With the suspension of the Egyptian Football league, Salah’s career looked bleak as did the future of Egyption Football.

During a friendly game with FC Basel, Salah came on as a substitue, putting on a display securing him a 4-year deal with the club.

Mohamed Salah would spend seasons at FC Basel (’12-’14), Chelsea (’14-’16) and Roma (’16-’17) before joining Liverpool FC in 2017.

Muslim Players such as Salah, Mane, Ozil and Pogba are not afraid to practice their faith and speak about their religion.

Celebrating his goals in prostration, Salah has not only broke records, but has also impacted the racist bigotry usually heard in the stands.

Sujoods ‘on the pitch’, visiting local Mosques and regular charity work have helped portray a positive image of Islam and Muslims.

Mohamed Salah has been a positive role model for young Muslims, breaking barriersand stereotypes along the way…
With a record breaking season, ‘The Egyptian King’ has been named PFA player of the year and is eyeing up the prestigious Balon d’Or.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Support our content by becoming a KJ Patreon
https://www.patreon.com/kjvids

Website – www.kjvids.co.uk
Facebook – www.facebook.com/KJVids
Twitter – www.twitter.com/kjvids2016
Instagram – www.instagram.com/kjvidsofficial

All Rights Reserved. Contact info@kjvids.co.uk if you are interested in licensing our content, advertising or working with us in other ways.

The Syrian Uprisings – Episode 1 – How the Syrian Uprisings Began

In a brand new series of KJ Videos, we will take an analytical look at the Syrian civil war from the beginning to today. In this episode, we will take you way back in time when the Syrian uprisings all began. But before we begin, don’t forget to like and subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest KJ Videos.

In 2011, successful uprisings – that became known as the Arab Spring – toppled Tunisia’s and Egypt’s presidents giving hope to Syrian activists who began mobilising protests.

At first it seems everything could be easily contained without the need for Gaddafi-like crackdowns.

On 17th February, however, the same day as the Benghazi protests began, things seemed more tense following an argument, between police and protestors in Damascus holding banners saying “The Syrian people will not be humiliated”

But when the interior minister visited the scene in person to assure the crowds that the police officers involved would be investigated, and when Bashar announces a range of new social welfare programmes along with the unblocking of social media platforms, it still seemed likely Syria could avoid the fate of Libya.

By March, however, things seemed to be getting more out of control as the increasingly heavy-handed and undoubtedly nervous regime proved unwilling to take more chances.

That March, peaceful protests erupted in Syria as well, after 15 boys were detained and tortured for writing graffiti in support of the Arab Spring. One of the boys, a 13-year-old, was killed after having been brutally tortured.

Dissidents in Syria’s southernmost city, Daraa, seemed poised to become the epicentre of an Urban revolt.

As the Syrian equivalent of Benghazi, Daraa’s message, soon spread to the historically restive Hama along with Homs and even parts of Damascus. A ‘day of dignity’ was held on 18th March, with an even bigger protest staged the following Friday.

As with Cairo’s Tahrir square, there were a mixture of protestors in Homs. Some were heard chanting ‘peaceful, Muslims, and Christians along with other such as ‘God, Syria freedom and nothing else.’ Other protests were calling for “the downfall of the Assad regime”

Although there were some reports of public buildings and Baath headquarters being burned down, in many cases the protests remained peaceful, with some even marching without their shirts to prove they held no concealed weapons.

Galvanised by the martyrdom of Hamza al-Khatib, a 13-year-old boy, who had been arrested and whose mutilated corpse was afterwards returned to his family, then protests gained a much harder edge.

The Syrian government responded to the protests by killing hundreds of demonstrators and imprisoning many more.
With dozens being killed every day and reportedly more than eight thousand arrested in just two months, mobile phone video footage began to go viral of soldiers haphazardly shooting protestors, including women and children.

Beyond such repression, the regime also engaged in two other strategies in an effort to keep its core constituency as loyal as possible and also to ward off any attempted external influence.

With much the same goal as Yemen’s, Ali Abdullah Saleh’s encouraging of Al-Qaeda militants to take over certain towns, Bashar began a ‘highly selective’ amnesty of prisoners. According to a report prepared for the European Parliament, these were known to include numerous prominent Jihadis such as Muhammed Al-Jowlani, Abu Khalid Al-Suri and Abu Musab al-Suri.

Adding further weight to claims that Bashar was trying to radicalise then opposition by emptying Jihadists into their ranks, there were reports that even before their release such inmates had already been moved to more comfortable prisons so that they could mingle with other political prisoners.

According to one Jihadist fighter later interviewed by the Guardian this was because the regime “wanted them to be radicalised…if this stayed as a street protest, it would have toppled the regime within months and they knew it.”

Within months of Bashar’s spring amnesty, suicide bombings begun in Damascus and Aleppo and by February 2012, the al-Jowlani formally established a Syrian Al-Qaeda franchise known as Jabhat al-Nusrah. Now more easily able to frame opposition attacks as terrorism and marginalise any remaining peaceful protestors.

We’re also currently running a crowdfunding campaign to help our operation produce more and better videos. You may donate what you towards our project here – http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/kj-vids

Support our content by becoming a KJ Patreon
https://www.patreon.com/kjvids

Website – www.kjvids.co.uk
Facebook – www.facebook.com/KJVids
Twitter – www.twitter.com/kjvids2016
Instagram – www.instagram.com/kjvidsofficial

All Rights Reserved. Contact info@kjvids.co.uk if you are interested in licensing our content, advertising or working with us in other ways.

Allama Iqbal: An Intellectual Giant

Allama Iqbal was born in November 1877, in Sialkot, a small city in British ruled Punjab. His father was a devoutly religious man and Iqbal attained the basic education of the deen from a local madrassa. He studied Philosophy and Law in England before completing his doctorate in Germany. Prior to this educational sojourn to Europe, Iqbal had been a talented yet typical poet, writing about abstract notions such as love, freedom and nationalism. In fact his poem, Saray Jahan se Acha, Hindustan Hamara (Our India is the best in the world) continues to retain its popularity in modern day India.

With this mindset, he travelled to Europe in 1905 enrolling at Trinity College, Cambridge University. It was in England, and his subsequent stay in Munich until 1908, that Iqbal began to appreciate the true beauty and comprehensive nature of the deen of Allah SWT. He famously wrote in his poem Tulu-e-Islam (The Rise of Islam), “Muslman ko Muslman kar diya Toofan-e-Maghrib ne” (the Muslim was solidified in Islam by the storm of the West), having been afforded a first-hand look at the thought and behaviour of the Europeans.

It is tempting to detail all of his musings upon Islam but the limitations of discourse do not allow such expansive rhetoric. This piece will look at a select few poems and writings, trying to deduce Iqbal’s vision of Islam as a comprehensive system of governance and life. In this arena, the subjects of secularism, democracy, capitalism, Muslim fraternity and nationalism will be highlighted in the vision of Iqbal. It must be acknowledged that he did not possess a flawless ideology upon the deen’s governance and he did attempt to formulate an aligning exercise within the deen and the modern systems of governance. In his essay on Islamic Political Thought, he detailed the dangers of both secularism and theocracy. He was acutely aware of allowing the monastic mullahs total control over the political process and warned against this practice in a vociferous manner.

Nevertheless, his writings upon the concepts used to disease this ummah, namely nationalism, democracy, secularism and capitalism were unequivocal and beautifully constructed. Central to this thought pattern is Iqbal’s staunch belief that there was no dichotomy between the deen of Allah and mainstream politics, one not being complete or correct without the other. A couplet from his collection of poems, Bal-e-Jibril, states “Jalal-e-badshahi ho ya jamhoori tamasha ho; Juda ho deen siyasat se to reh jati hey changezi” (whether it is the royalty of the Kings, or the facade of the democrats; if you separate the deen from politics, you are left with the barbarism of Ghenghis Khan). In fact, this secular ideology was the driving factor behind his interest and involvement in political Islam. In his address to the conference of the All-India Muslim League in 1930, he stated “politics have their roots in the spiritual life of man. It is my belief that Islam is not a matter of private opinion. It is a society. It is because present day political ideas, that appear to be shaping themselves in India (Muslim), may affect its original structure and character that I find myself interested in politics“.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel

We’re also currently running a crowdfunding campaign to help our operation produce more and better videos. You may donate what you towards our project here – http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/kj-vids

Support our content by becoming a KJ Patreon
https://www.patreon.com/kjvids

Website – www.kjvids.co.uk
Facebook – www.facebook.com/KJVids
Twitter – www.twitter.com/kjvids2016
Instagram – www.instagram.com/kjvidsofficial

All Rights Reserved. Contact info@kjvids.co.uk if you are interested in licensing our content, advertising or working with us in other ways.

Scroll to top