• Type:
  • Genre:
  • Duration:
  • Average Rating:

Month: September 2017

Geopolitical Strengths of Pakistan – Urdu Version

Pakistan occupies important tracts of land and is naturally couched in strategic geography.

It has a repository of extremely diverse physical contours extending for miles on end giving it a unique advantage.

Pakistan is bounded on the north by the Himalaya Mountains that stretch across the border of India and China.

The mountains are full of rough terrain, small roads, and hidden strategic points.

This gives the mountains a considerable worth when it comes to military stratagem.

In the event of war, travel by the enemies Tanks and other armoured vehicles, would be slow and expensive.

To avoid the prolonged time of travel, the enemy must transport troops and vehicles by air.

But this can be countered by Pakistan’s defendable surface to air missile sites that would be deployed discreetly in mountains.

The Pakistan-India border, traverses a variety of terrains ranging from major urban areas to Scorching deserts.

To support its naval ambitions, Pakistan is expanding its shipyard in Karachi with a modern ship-lift-and-transfer system.

Pakistan intends to acquire 8 new submarines from China, 4 Turkish corvettes and 2 Dutch patrol ships.

The Pakistan Navy is building a large submarine fleet that will be capable of threatening enemy naval fleets.

Pakistan’s military has strong relations with the militaries of the Middle East, including Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

Together, these powers can propel the production of advanced fighters, warships and other weapons, and also fuel them.

Pakistan has a burgeoning defence industry, one that lets it field its own fighters, tanks, cruise missiles and other systems affordably.

Pakistan has the potential to strengthen itself and become a world leading military power.…

The Geopolitical Significance of Afghanistan

Afghanistan is the world’s 42nd-largest country and has an area of 250,000 square miles.

Throughout its history, Afghanistan has been subject to intervention by external powers.

Afghanistan is a land-locked region. It borders with China, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Iran and Tajikistan.

The northern and southern portion of Afghanistan is divided by the massive Hindu Kush mountain ranges.

The Pamir Mountains to the northeast (the roof of the world) are the junction between Tajikistan, Afghanistan and China.

In the east, the passes in Suleiman mountain range like the famous Khyber Pass have provided access to the Indian subcontinent.

The country’s forbidding landscape of deserts and mountains has laid many imperial ambitions to rest.

As has the fierceless and tireless resistance of its peoples.

Additionally, Afghanistan is adjacent to Middle Eastern countries that are rich in oil and natural gas.

Having control of Afghanistan means having control of pipeline routes and energy resources.

Pipelines are important today in the same way that railway building was important in the 19th century.

They connect trading partners and influence the regional balance of power.

Afghanistan is a strategic piece of real estate in the geopolitical struggle for power and dominance in the region.

It plays a vital rule in efficiently connecting the regions and for this reason remains a geopolitical necessity for any great power.…

The 1979 Iranian Revolution – Was Ruhollah Khomeini a U.S Agent?

The Iranian Revolution of 1979 was a popular uprising in Iran in 1979 that resulted in the toppling of the monarchy of Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi.

In 2016 it was revealed that the US had extensive contact with Ayatollah Khomeini before the Iranian revolution.

Documents seen by the BBC suggest that the Carter administration paved the way for Khomeini to return to Iran by holding the army back from launching a military coup.

A 1980 CIA study says “in November 1963 Ayatollah Khomeini sent a message to the United States Government through a Tehran University professor called Haj Mirza Khalil Kamarei, in which he explained “that he was not opposed to American interests in Iran” and that “on the contrary, he thought the American presence was necessary as a counterbalance to Soviet and possibly British influence”

In January 1979, in what was officially described as a “vacation,” the shah and his family fled Iran.

Crowds in excess of one million demonstrated in Tehrān, proving the wide appeal of Khomeini.

On April 1 1979, following overwhelming support in a national referendum, Khomeini declared Iran an Islamic republic.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Sign up to our website and submit video suggestions:
www.kjvids.co.uk

Like our Facebook page for exclusive updates:
https://www.facebook.com/KJVids

Follow us on Instagram for our one minute vids:
https://www.instagram.com/kjvids2016

Follow us on Twitter to be informed when we post:
https://twitter.com/kjvids2016

Support our content by becoming a KJ Patreon
https://www.patreon.com/kjvids

All Rights Reserved. Contact info@kjvids.co.uk if you are interested in licensing our content, advertising or working with us in other ways.…

2013 Egypt Rabaa Massacre

Exactly four years ago, hundreds of Egyptian protesters were killed in Cairo’s Rabaa al-Adawiya Square when security forces violently dispersed a sit-in held to support ousted President Mohamed Morsi.

Six weeks before the massacre, Morsi — Egypt’s first freely elected president and a leader of the now-banned Muslim Brotherhood — had been ousted and imprisoned by the formidable military establishment.

In the four years since the bloody sit-in dispersal, Egypt’s post-coup authorities have waged a wide-ranging crackdown on dissent, killing hundreds of Brotherhood members and Morsi supporters and throwing thousands more behind bars.…

Pakistan Soldier on Burma: “Give us the orders, we are ready for war”

Pakistan soldier on Burma: “Give us the orders, we are ready for war”

We found this video on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/117060348439808/videos/1238497232962775

A Pakistani soldier explains that Pakistan is ready to rescue Muslims of Kashmir and Burma and that the only thing that is stopping them is orders from their cheif. He says that his army will annihilate the oppressors off the face of this earth.

It is clear from this video that Pakistan is not happy at all with the Rohingya situation and wants to help but is restricted due to political interests.

 

 …

The British Colonisation of Burma

Many people horrified by the brutality of the Burmese regime say that the ‘international community’ should intervene in the country.
But the history of Burma shows that meddling by imperial powers has always made things worse.

Many people horrified by the brutality of the Burmese regime say that the ‘international community’ should intervene in the country.

But the history of Burma shows that meddling by imperial powers has always made things worse.

Throughout the 19th century the British steadily moved into Burma from India and by 1885 conquered the country, deposing the king and incorporating the country into India.

The invasion was marked by savagery, with troops burning down villages and suppressing dissent with mass executions.

Once in control the British ripped up Burma’s economy and environment.

In Northern Burma, the British harvested the teak wood forests that were used for ship building, furniture, and selling.

In the South, the British increased crop production in the fertile Irrawaddy Delta create more revenue.

For example, in 1855, the delta produced 162,000 ton of rice. In 1905, the number jumped to 2 million tons. The increased production and increasing prices of rice created great wealth for Britain

Additionally, the British mined the famous rubies of Burma and other minerals.

The economic impact for British ultimately became positive through harvesting teak wood, growing crops, and mining minerals.

Burmese people were becoming poor after they were forced to work on British factories and farms and leave their self-sufficient jobs and farms.

This created an economic crisis for the Burmese people which caused them to be desperate for money.

A negative environmental impact for Burma was the uncontrollable deforestation of the teak forests by the British

The mangrove forests were replaced with rice paddies, while British monopolies looted the country of oil, teak and rubies.

Over the following 20 years of British rule Burmese society disintegrated.

The British maintained control through ‘divide and rule’ tactics, setting Burma’s various national minorities against each other

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Sign up to our website and submit video suggestions:
www.kjvids.co.uk

Like our Facebook page for exclusive updates:
https://www.facebook.com/KJVids

Follow us on Instagram for our one minute vids:
https://www.instagram.com/kjvids2016

Follow us on Twitter to be informed when we post:
https://twitter.com/kjvids2016

Support our content by becoming a KJ Patreon
https://www.patreon.com/kjvids

All Rights Reserved. Contact info@kjvids.co.uk if you are interested in licensing our content, advertising or working with us in other ways.…

China’s Economic Miracle | The Rise of China Mini-Documentary | Episode 1

Please contribute towards KJ Vids research and editing costs at www.fundmypage.com/kjvids.

The Rise of China Mini-Documentary | Episode 1 | China’s Economic Miracle

Two centuries ago, Napoleon warned, “Let China sleep: when she wakes, she will shake the world.”

The rise of China will undoubtedly be one of the great dramas of the twenty-first century. China’s extraordinary economic growth and active diplomacy are already transforming East Asia, and future decades will see even greater increases in Chinese power and influence.

In this episode we will look only at the sheer size of China today. We will then look at it’s threats, challenges and confrontations with America in future episodes.

In 1980, China’s gross domestic product (GDP) was less than 300 billion dollars; by 2015, it was 11 trillion dollars—making it the world’s second-largest economy by market exchange rates. China’s trade with the outside world in 1980 amounted to less than 40 billion dollars; by 2015, it had increased one hundredfold, to a whopping 4 trillion dollars.

Even at its lower growth rate in 2015, China’s economy created a Greece every sixteen weeks and an Israel every twenty-five weeks.

Measured by purchasing power parity, which measures how many aircraft, missiles, ships, sailors, pilots, drones, bases, and other military- related items a state can buy and the prices it has to pay in its own national currency, China has not only surpassed the US, but also now accounts for roughly 18 percent of world GDP, compared to just 2 percent in 1980.

By 2005, the country was building the square-foot equivalent of today’s Rome every two weeks.

Between 2011 and 2013, China both produced and used more cement than US did in the entire twentieth century.

On its current path, China will surpass the US to become the world leader in research-and-development spending by 2019.

Since June 2013, the world’s fastest supercomputer has been located not in Silicon Valley but in China. Indeed, in the rankings of the world’s 500 fastest supercomputers—a list from which China was absent in 2001—today it has 167, two more than the United States. Moreover, China’s top supercomputer is five times faster than the closest American competitor. And while China’s supercomputers previously relied heavily on American processors, its top computer in 2016 was built entirely with domestic processors.

As China’s economy has gotten bigger, its guns and tanks—and their twenty-first-century equivalents—have gotten better, and allowed for a new level of competition with other great powers, especially the United States. Just as technology start-ups like Facebook and Uber have used the concept of disruptive innovation to upend previously dominant firms, the Chinese military is developing new technologies that can counter ships, planes, and satellites that the US has developed over decades—and for a fraction of the cost.

China has increased its defense spending nearly fivefold over the last decade. China currently spends more on defense than Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, and Vietnam combined, and China’s military spending is second only to the United States.

China is now …

Rohingya Muslims – 10 Fast Facts

Rohingya Muslims – 10 Fast Facts

Currently, there are about 1.1 million Rohingya Muslims who live in the Southeast Asian country.

The Rohingya speak Rohingya or Ruaingga, a dialect that is distinct to others spoken in Rakhine State and throughout Myanmar.

They are not considered one of the country’s 135 official ethnic groups and have been denied citizenship in Myanmar since 1982
Nearly all of the Rohingya in Myanmar live in the western coastal state of Rakhine and are not allowed to leave without government permission.

Muslims have lived in the area now known as Myanmar since as early as the 12th century, according to many historians and Rohingya groups.

Rohingya found outside refugee camps in Thailand are treated the same as illegal immigrants.

Since the late 1970s, nearly one million Rohingya Muslims have fled Myanmar due to widespread persecution.

According to the most recently available data from the United Nations in May, more than 168,000 Rohingya have fledMyanmar since 2012.

Following violence that broke out last year, more than 87,000 Rohingya fled to Bangladesh from October 2016 to July 2017,

The international community has labelled the Rohingya the “most persecuted minority in the world”.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Sign up to our website and submit video suggestions:
www.kjvids.co.uk

Like our Facebook page for exclusive updates:
https://www.facebook.com/KJVids

Follow us on Instagram for our one minute vids:
https://www.instagram.com/kjvids2016

Follow us on Twitter to be informed when we post:
https://twitter.com/kjvids2016

All Rights Reserved. Contact info@kjvids.co.uk if you are interested in licensing our content, advertising or working with us in other ways.…

Aurangzeb – The Great Mughal Emperor

Aurangzeb – The Great Sultan of Mughal India

He was the great ruler of the Mughal Sultanate under whose watch Islam flourished in the subcontinent, reaching its high watermark before the military defeats at the hands of Hindu forces in subsequent decades, and before its eventual collapse under the pressure of the British.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Sign up to our website and submit video suggestions:
www.kjvids.co.uk

Like our Facebook page for exclusive updates:
https://www.facebook.com/KJVids

Follow us on Instagram for our one minute vids:
https://www.instagram.com/kjvids2016

Follow us on Twitter to be informed when we post:
https://twitter.com/kjvids2016

All Rights Reserved. Contact info@kjvids.co.uk if you are interested in licensing our content, advertising or working with us in other ways.…

The Geopolitics of Myanmar

Since ancient times, the land known today as Myanmar has been famous for its wealth in natural resources of all kinds.

The Sanskrit name Suvarnabhumi, meaning “Golden Land,” has been associated with Myanmar for over two millennia.

Myanmar is geologically very rich, and mining is significant as a large-scale industry

Mineral occurrences cover all sectors, including base metals (gold, copper, silver, lead, zinc, tin, antimony, iron, etc.), industrial minerals, energy sources (mainly coal), gems (jade, rubies, sapphires, etc.), as well as “rare earth” minerals.

Myanmar is perhaps best known for gold, jade, rubies, and sapphires. It is estimated that in the past, 90 percent of the world’s rubies came from Myanmar.

Myanmar is also one of the world’s oldest oil producers, having first exported its first barrel in 1853 while under British colonial rule.

Myanmar’s energy ministry lists proven crude oil reserve estimates of $3.2 billion barrels and gas reserves of 11.8 trillion cubic feet (placing it about eight in the world)

With its untapped natural resources, large potential of its nascent markets and strategic geographic location connecting South and Southeast Asia (and mainland China), Myanmar is a geopolitical asset.

Aside from its economic value, Myanmar’s strategic location serves as an important link for China’s market expansion in South and Southeast Asia.

A critical lifeline for China is access to maritime routes. The main and historic ports of China sit along the South and East China seas and are problematic due to their exposure to the Malacca Strait choke point.

China can overcome this constraint in multiple ways, including bypassing it altogether with direct land access to the Indian Ocean.

China’s approach to securing this overland access to the Indian Ocean is through Myanmar.

But to achieve this goal, China must have influence over, or be on good terms with, Myanmar’s government.

U.S.-Burmese ties had been on a downward trajectory since the military coup in 1988. The U.S. responded by imposing sanctions, banning imports

During this period of disengagement from the ruling junta, neighboring China was moving in and gaining influence.

China became a leading trade partner of Myanmar and developed extensive diplomatic, commercial, and military ties.

China gained access to Burmese ports in the Bay of Bengal, which provided it with the ability to project power and establish a military foothold in the region

It also assisted in the development of a port at Kyaukpyu. This is significant, as the Chinese are developing an oil and natural gas pipeline directly to China

This pipeline would enable China to import oil from the Middle East while bypassing the Straits of Malacca

The advancement of U.S.-Burmese relations will have profound strategic implications for China as it nervously watches the U.S. moves in the region.

The competition over Myanmar is also core reason why both America and China have ignored the ethnic cleansing of Rohingya Muslims in Burma.

As the geopolitical competition between America and China intensify, Myanmar, will increasingly make the news and the region is likely …

Enjoy 12 week's access for £12

Get unlimited access to our news, analyses and forecasts

Get unlimited access to our news, analyses and forecasts

Login to your account

If you are already a KJ Member, please login

Login to your account
Scroll to top