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Month: June 2017

Top 5 Wars in the 20th Century

War rages on everywhere, in every century. It seems like a part of human life. People have their own views and interests, and it seems unavoidable. The twentieth century has its fair share of scars in the history books and In today’s video we will present 5 wars that had the most military deaths in the 20th century.

Nigerian Civil War 

1967 to 1970 – 500,000

The Nigerian Civil War, better known as the Biafran War, was a war between the government of Nigeria and the secessionist state of Biafra.  Biafra represented nationalist aspirations of the Igbo people, whose leadership felt they could no longer coexist with the Northern-dominated federal government.

The conflict resulted from political, economic, ethnic, cultural and religious tensions which preceded Britain’s formal decolonisation of Nigeria from 1960 to 1963. The Immediate causes of the war in 1966 included a military coup, a counter-coup, and persecution of Igbo people living in Northern Nigeria. Control over oil production in the Niger Delta also played a vital strategic role.

Korean War    

1950 to 1953 – 741,000 +/-

Korea was ruled by Japan from 1910 until the closing days of World War II. In August 1945, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, as a result of an agreement with the United States, and invaded Korea north of the 38th parallel.  US forces subsequently moved into the south. By 1948, as a product of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, Korea was split into two regions, with separate governments. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate government of

all of Korea, and neither side accepted the border as permanent. The conflict escalated

into open warfare when North Korean forces—supported by the Soviet Union and China invading the South.

Second Sino Japanese War   

1937 to 1941 – Estimated deaths 4,500,000

The Second Sino-Japanese War was a military conflict fought primarily between the Republic

of China and the Empire of Japan from July 1937 to September 1945. It began with the

Marco Polo Bridge Incident in 1937 in which a dispute between Japanese and Chinese troops

escalated into a battle. The conflict escalated and only ended with the unconditional

surrender of Japan in September 1945 to the United Nations allies of World War II.

World War I  

1914 to 1918 – 9,000,000

World War I (WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, the Chemist’s War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from July 1914 to  November 1918. More than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, were mobilised in one of the  largest wars in history. Over nine million combatants and seven million civilians died as a result of the war, including the victims of a number of genocides

World War 2   

1939–1945 – up to 85 million

Also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although related conflicts began earlier. It involved the vast majority of the world’s countries—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis.

It was the most widespread war in history, and directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of “total war”, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, erasing the distinction between civilian and military resources.

Marked by mass deaths of civilians, including the Holocaust (in which approximately 11 million people were killed) and the strategic bombing of industrial and population centres (Including the first use of the atomic bomb on japan, ending the Japanese/American conflict in the pacific) this leaves ww2 as the largest and bloodiest war in history.

Cow Vigilante’s have killed 23 Muslims since 2014

Read original article on the Times of India or read just the key stats below;

  1. A review of media reports shows 32 cases of attacks by mobs or vigilante groups on Muslims since May 2014. In these attacks, 23 people were killed, including women and children. This is a conservative estimate because many attacks may not have been covered in national media.
  2. In most cases, the issue of cows has been the proximate cause – allegations of cow slaughter, smuggling, eating or even possessing beef. In some cases, rumours and false suspicions of ‘child lifting’ were fueling the mob frenzy, like in Jharkhand and West Bengal.
  3. And in some, the pretext of cows was used for committing heinous crimes, as in the gang rape of two young women and murder of their two relatives in Mewat, Haryana. The spread of these cow terrorism cases – 12 states in all – is chilling as is the fact that the number is escalating.
  4. Between June 2014 and December 2015, 11 such attacks took place, but after that, the pace has increased with 2016 recording 12 cases and 2017, 9 cases in six months.
  5. According to home ministry annual reports, there have been 1,454 communal incidents over 2015 and 2016, in which 183 people have been killed and 4,585 injured. This is on the basis of reports by state governments.

Saudi Arabia’s next King secures power by confining Uncle to palace

Read original article on Newsweek or read a quick summary below;

  1. According to officials, the Saudi prince removed as second-in-line to the throne last week, Mohammed bin Nayef, has been confined to his palace in the Red Sea city of Jeddah.
  2. The move is reportedly a bid to ensure no challenge to his 31-year-old successor, the modernizing face of Saudi Arabia and son of ageing King Salman, Mohammed bin Salman, four former and current Saudi and U.S. officials told the New York Times.
  3. The restrictions on his movements came after the reshuffle on Wednesday but it is unclear how long they will last. In the reshuffle, King Salman also replaced Nayef as Interior Minister with 33-year-old Prince Abdulaziz bin Saud.
  4. But Riyadh has been at pains to show a united front after the shake-up, showing the new crown prince, commonly known by his moniker “MbS,” kissing the hand of the very uncle he was replacing. Nayef also pledged allegiance to his nephew in a public show of support after the decision.
  5. Bin Salman is viewed as an ambitious figure with international prestige, one who has carried out state visits to meet the likes of U.S. Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump in Washington and Vladimir Putin in Moscow in place of his elderly father.
  6. Bin Salman, who diplomats refer to as “Mr. Everything” because of his power, is leading a reformist program known as Vision 2030, aiming to appease the frustrations of a population of which over half are under 25 years old. It seeks social and economic change while diversifying the country’s economy away from oil.

 

The Top 5 Countries with the Highest Percentage of Underweight Children

Hunger is a worldwide problem, Hundreds die every hour from starvation, and the problem will not fade away anytime soon. In this video, we count down the top five Countries with the highest percentage of underweight children.

Bangladesh

Bangladesh’s population is large in 2015 the population was at a grand 161 million, and 36.8% of the child population were underweight and 16.7% where undernourished. Bangladesh still cannot provide its people with a fair amount of nutritious foods, says a global report on hunger. Bangladesh has slipped further to 90th position in the hunger index out of 118 countries, showing a 17-notch fall from the previous year’s 73rd place. The country ranked 57 the year before (2014).

Niger

Niger is a vast desert country and one of the poorest on earth. Millions of people, a third of the population, face food shortages. 51.2% of children in Niger are underweight, Starving or malnourished. Aid agencies estimate that tens of thousands of children are in the advanced stages of starvation. Children are dying daily in the few feeding centres there are, where their place in the queue could make the difference between life and death.

Yemen

17 million Yemenis are hungry That’s 2/3 of the country’s population. It is one of the largest food crisis in the world in this country Almost half the population is on the edge of famine. … It’s a huge crisis. The situation? 43.1%  Children are underweight and 25.7% malnourished.

Yemen grows little of its own food, and must import 90 percent of all its goods, but the war has severely limited imports. A naval blockade by Saudi Arabia, with US support, slows maritime traffic and imposes time-consuming inspections. Damage to the country’s largest deep-water port, has further slowed World Food Program deliveries.

India

India with a population of over 1.2 billion, has seen tremendous growth in the past two decades. Gross Domestic Product has increased 4.5 times and per capita consumption has increased 3 times. Similarly, food grain production has increased almost 2 times. However, despite phenomenal industrial and economic growth and while India produces sufficient food to feed its population, it is unable to provide access to food to a large number of people, especially women and children. 194 million people are undernourished in India. By this measure India is home to a quarter of the undernourished population in the world. Also 48% of women between 15 and 49 years of age are anaemic and 44% of children under 5 are underweight.

Somalia

Somalia is ranked number 1 on our list as 45.3% are underweight and 38% are malnourished. 6 million people in Somalia are considered ‘food insecure’. 360,000 Children in Somalia are malnourished. Without Water there can be no crops, no crops = no food and the severe water issue in Somalia is rising, Somalis try to gather water any way they can. Communities drill deep bores 200 to 400 metres underground to access groundwater. Shallow wells are dug in the mountains and dams are built to collect surface water. Trucking in water is also common, where water trucks come periodically to refill water reservoirs called berkads. But these methods do not always provide safe and reliable sources for drinking water.

References

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2224rank.html

http://www.fao.org/3/a-i4030e.pdf

http://www.fao.org/3/a-i4030e.pdf

http://www.poverty.com/

T.E Lawrence (The Lawrence of Arabia) and the Arab Revolt

This British strategy of colonial divide and rule reached its peak in the Middle East during and after the First World War. During the War Britain appealed to the Arabs in the Middle East to join it in overthrowing Ottoman rule of their territories. But where does T.E Lawrence, better known as, “The Lawrence of Arabia” come into all of this?

In this video we take a brief look at the role of T.E Lawrence in the Arab Revolt during WW1.

In May 1915, Britain proclaimed to the ‘people of Arabia’ that:

‘the religion of Islam has always been most respected by the English government’, and that, despite the sultan of Turkey having become an enemy, ‘our policy of respect and friendliness towards Islam remains unchanged’.

Britain made promises to the then ruler of the holy city of Mecca, Sharif Hussain who agreed to lead an Arab revolt in return for British recognition of him after the war, as the ruler of a vast territory stretching from present-day Syria to Yemen, thus encompassing all of modern Saudi Arabia.

“The British government wrote to Hussein in November 1914, stating that:

If the Amir and Arabs in general assist Great Britain in this conflict that has been forced upon us by Turkey, Great Britain will promise not to intervene in any manner whatsoever whether in things religious or otherwise . . . Till now we have defended and befriended Islam in the person of the Turks: henceforward it shall be in that of the noble Arab. It may be that an Arab of true race will assume the Khalifate at Mecca or Medina, and so good may come by the help of God out of all the evil that is now occurring.”

This last momentous sentence was Britain promising to help restore the Islamic Caliphate to Arabia and for Sherif Hussein to be the new caliph, the successor to the Turkish sultan.

Lord Kitchener, the secretary of state for war, noted in March 1915 that ‘if the Khalifate were transferred to Arabia, it would remain to a great extent under our influence.’

Sherif Hussein came out in revolt against the Ottoman empire in June 1916, recruiting a small Arab force of a few thousand men to fight in the Hijaz region, the western coastal area of Arabia containing the cities of Jeddah, Mecca and Medina.

British officers served as military advisers to Hussein’s revolt; one such was Colonel T. E. Lawrence ‘of Arabia’, an aide to Faisal, Sherif Hussein’s son. Lawrence was appointed to command the Faisals military forces.

One month before the Arab revolt broke out, Britain and France secretly agreed to divide the Middle East between their zones of influence, in the Sykes-Picot Agreement, named after their respective foreign ministers.

Lawrence, supposedly the great ‘liberator’ of the Arab world, wrote an intelligence memo in January 1916 stating that the Arab revolt was:

beneficial to us because it marches with our immediate aims, the break up of the Islamic ‘bloc’ and the defeat and disruption of the Ottoman Empire, and because the states [Sherif Hussein] would set up to succeed the Turks would be . . . harmless to ourselves . . . The Arabs are even less stable than the Turks. If properly handled they would remain in a state of political mosaic, a tissue of small jealous principalities incapable of cohesion.           

After the war, Lawrence wrote a report for the British Cabinet entitled ‘Reconstruction of Arabia’, arguing that it was urgent for the British and their allies to find a Muslim leader who could counter the Ottoman empire’s attempted jihad against them in the name of the caliph:

“When war broke out an urgent need to divide Islam was added, and we became reconciled to seek for allies rather than subjects . . . We hoped by the creation of a ring of client states, themselves insisting on our patronage, to turn the present and future flank of any foreign power with designs on the three rivers [Iraq]. The greatest obstacle, from a war standpoint, to any Arab movement, was its greatest virtue in peace-time – the lack of solidarity between the various Arab movements … The Sherif [Hussein] was ultimately chosen because of the rift he would create in Islam.”

Lawrence of Arabia 2nd from right, middle row. (National Archives)

The benefit of division in the Middle East was also recognised by the foreign department of the British government of India: ‘What we want’, it stated, ‘is not a United Arabia, but a weak and disunited Arabia, split up into little principalities so far as possible under our suzerainty – but incapable of coordinated action against us, forming a buffer against the Powers in the West.’

So there you go guys, this a brief history of the role of T.E Lawrence and how he played a role on behalf of the British Government to divide the Ottoman Caliphate.

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How the Ottoman Caliphate saved Jack Sparrow?

How the Ottoman Caliphate saved Jack Sparrow?

Behind the comical action of the Hollywood hit movie “Pirates of the Caribbean” lies an interesting historical truth. While the historical character of Captain Jack Sparrow in the movie was an Englishman, historical facts indicate that he led an adventurous life and had converted to Islam.

Learn more at How the Ottoman Caliphate Saved Jack Sparrow?

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Al-Jazari’s 800 Year Old Automatic Elephant Clock

Al-Jazari’s 800 year old automatic Elephant clock using water technology. An example of the Muslim origins of modern automation and robotics.

Muslim Scholars brought many new inventions and also they improved or re-introduced old inventions like the Elephant clock which embraced many cultures as a scientific dedication of respect and understanding.

The seven meters high clock uses Greek water raising technology, an Indian elephant, an Egyptian phoenix, Arabian figures, Persian carpet, and Chinese dragons, to celebrate the diversity of the world.

 

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Ibn Sina’s ‘Canon’ Book – A medical reference in Europe for 500 Years

The Sheikh al-Ra’is Sharaf al-Mulk Abu ‘Ali al-Husayn b. ‘Abd Allah b. al-Hasan b. ‘Ali Ibn Sina, in Latin he is know as Avicenna and his most famous works are those on philosophy and medicine.

His philosophical views have engaged the attention of Western thinkers over several centuries, and his books have been among the most important sources in philosophy.

In medicine, his encyclpedic book, al-Qanun (The Canon) – Al Qanun Fi Al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine) – was translated into Latin towards the end of the twelfth century CE, and became a reference source for medical studies in the universities of Europe until the end of the seventeenth century.

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Muslims in India wear black bands to Eid prayers in protest of recent lynchings

Read original report on Hindustan Times or read a quick summary below;

  1. Muslims wore black arm bands in some parts of Madhya Pradesh’s Bundelkhand on Monday while offering Eid prayers at local mosques to protest against recent attacks on their community members.
  2. Nazir Khan, a teacher who came for prayers at the Eidgah in Bundelkhand, said mobs were targeting Muslim youth and murdering them without reason. “If they are guilty then action must be taken according to law which is a democratic thing. But not the way it is being done these days. We are protesting against this brutality in a peaceful and democratic manner”, he said.
  3. Abid Suleiman, president of Muslim Mahasabha Nowgawh, said frequent attacks on “our innocent Muslim youth without any proof of their involvement in any wrongdoing is bothering our community. Without police complaint, one sided action is being taken against them. Today we are wearing black bands to protest against government’s failure to check such incidents”.
  4. On Thursday, a 16-year-old Muslim boy was stabbed to death and his three brothers were injured on a Mathura-bound train. The prime suspect Ramesh was part of a mob that attacked the four brothers who were on their way back home to Haryana’s Ballabhgarh after Eid shopping at Sadar Bazar. In April, a Muslim dairy farmer was lynched in Rajasthan by alleged cow vigilantes.

 

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